In 1968, Computers Got Personal: How The ‘Mother of all Demos’ Changed The World

On a crisp California afternoon in early December 1968, a square-jawed, mild-mannered Stanford researcher named Douglas Engelbart took the stage at San Francisco’s Civic Auditorium and proceeded to blow everyone’s mind about what computers could do. Sitting down at a keyboard, this computer-age Clark Kent calmly showed a rapt audience of computer engineers how the…

Netizen Report: Online Censorship Roundup

The Advox Netizen Report offers an international snapshot of challenges, victories, and emerging trends in Internet rights around the world. What Role Does Facebook Play in Libya’s Civil War? Earlier this week, Facebook was blocked in the Libyan capital Tripoli and surrounding cities, as fighting between armed militias raged. On 3 September, Reuters reported that…

How Black Slaves Were Routinely Sold as ‘Specimens’ to Ambitious White Doctors

The history of human experimentation is as old as the practice of medicine and in the modern era has always targeted disadvantaged, marginalised, institutionalised, stigmatised and vulnerable populations: prisoners, the condemned, orphans, the mentally ill, students, the poor, women, the disabled, children, peoples of colour, indigenous peoples and the enslaved. Human subject research is evident…

Lost City of Etzanoa Now Open To Public In Kansas

The lost city of Etzanoa, one of the largest Native American archeological sites in the entire United States, has been opened to the public. Located in Arkansas City, Kansas, experts believe the site may exceed the size of the Cahokia Mounds. Using new translations of Spanish conquistador documents that were compiled by researchers at the University of California…

Castle Rock: The New Must See Show From Hulu

Stephen King adaptations have a reputation of either being spectacularly good or an absolute disaster. While the likes of It and The Shawshank Redemption stand as icons of cinema, there’s certainly more than a few clangers to level the playing field. Recent years have been good to fans of King’s work however, with 11.22.63 and…

Historic Artefacts Discovered During Cleanup of New York’s Gowanus Canal

Several artefacts of historical interest have been found during the ongoing cleanup operation at New York’s Gowanus Canal, one of the dirtiest and most polluted bodies of water in the entire United States. The Gowanus Canal, originally known as Gowanus Creek, is a 1.8-mile canal in Brooklyn, New York, that was once a key part…

Aretha Franklin, Queen of Soul and Civil Rights Icon, Dead at 76

Described variously as “the voice of the civil rights movement,” “the voice of black America,” “a symbol of black equality” and of course “The Queen of soul,’ the great Aretha Franklin has died at her home in Detroit, she was 76. Born in Memphis in 1942, Aretha Franklin was one of the true giants of…

Mental Health of Donald Trump Under New Scrutiny After Omarosa Book

The release of Unhinged, the “tell all” book by former Trump aide Omarosa Manigault Newman has brought the physical, moral and mental wellbeing of President Trump under renewed scrutiny following a series of sensational claims in the new memoir. Working as Trump’s diversity advisor as Director of Communications for the Office of Public Liaison, Omarosa…

Possible Skeleton of Sir George Yeardley Unearthed at Jamestown

Archeologists digging at a 400 year old church in Jamestown, Virginia believe they may have uncovered the skeleton of Sir George Yeardley, one of the first politicians and slave owners in the history of the United States. The excavation at the church is a joint endeavour by the Jamestown Rediscovery Foundation and the Smithsonian Institution…